The Hoover Dam originally wasn't on the itinerary. In fact whilst composing said itinerary this wasn't even contemplated. More so because our time in this part of the world was brief and because it never really crossed my mind as a point of interest; not for this sojourn at least. Strangely enough this is a site I feel as though I am overly familiar with, having grown up viewing and hearing copious references many times over. And thanks to the countless 80's comedic movies I was consumed by as a child, I suppose you could say that magic of the Hoover Dam was lost on me. Or perhaps there never really was any to begin hence such blatant disregard for one of man's greatest accomplishments in engineering.

But alas as fate would have it, Hoover Dam was indeed explored on this trip; albeit a most brief expedition.

Because of a turn of kismet, suddenly this destination was highlighted. Yet in hindsight, it had been a forceful omnipresent the entire time. I'd just been so oblivious to it. While I noted remarks on it here and there, it was even more present whilst we gallivanted around the Vegas strip, where mentions of the Hoover Dam ran rampant. From tourism signage and placards to mere conversations between individuals waiting in lengthy lines. It almost was a hot topic of exchange, both in terms of general tourism and environmental matters.

So how did the Hoover Dam actually come to be for us? On our final night in Las Vegas (read about my time in Las Vegas here), I checked the National Park Service for any alerts for visiting the Grand Canyon the following day. To my dismay it advised against travel due to the anticipation of a snow storm centred for that area.

And thus the catalyst for visiting the Hoover Dam.

But it undeniably worked in our favor.

Not only did we get to see this marvel in person, we also avoided what would have been a horrendously unpleasant (read, frightful drive for two Aussie's who've never seen let alone driven in snow before) ride through a snow storm.

Though we far from escaped such terror as the drive from Hoover Dam to Flagstaff, Arizona saw our last leg literally navigating at a snails pace (and I mean literally). I may be a little dramatic when I speak of this drive as it wasn't too strenuous. At least nothing our faithful rental Jeep couldn't handle. We started with a parched landscape which then merged from barren and rocky to even more desolation and eventually thinning out to fall flush with the horizon, passionately emphasizing those monumental beasts we'd just slipped through.

After a while a blanket of white curtains and shields the accustomed plain of aridity before us. But in a flash it vanishes as we breeze past, making us question if our eyes were deceiving us. The next few moments do nothing to dispel such emotions as haphazard lumps of white splay here and there; reserved to one side of the road, then drastically moving to the other. At the sight of an upcoming field of snow I pull over and we revel in this phenomena. Our antics score us a chorus of vehicular toots from many a passerby; no doubt recognising the unfolding scenes as none other than Aussie tourist tomfoolery.

And while it was all fun and games at dusk, as we moved closer to our destination, nightfall crept and with it, temperatures plummeted as we slowly approached the fringes of a waning snow storm. The very one we tried so desperately to evade. Gripping the wheel I drove forth, unsure and utterly aghast over the possibility of black ice; whatever that was. And because of such uncertainty I kept the car at a leisurely pace, stuck fast behind a large semi-trailer, if he swerved, so did I. I refused to give up my position behind him, undeterred by the numerous vehicles sweeping past us. It felt like a fool proof plan and in the end, it got us to out destination in one piece. Despite being hours belated.

But enough of those snow escapades, I'll continue with this story in another post.

Visiting Hoover Dam was truly astounding and stirred so many emotions within. From serious concern over water levels to the phenomenal marvel of such a prodigious site and the seemingly glorious triumph of engineering. A legitimately monumental feat of construction; one dominating obvious intense power over Mother Nature herself. One so fierce that the actual creation and act of repressing such a mass and body of water literally marred the Earth's crust and induced hundreds of earthquakes.

The sheer scale of Hoover Dam is indescribable and it's easy to see why it had such an impact geologically.

And yet it's difficult to get a palpable sense of this as you drive over it; even while meandering through the various parking lots, catching glimpses here and there. Even when you step out of your car it's hard to grasp (depending on where you've parked). But as you close in on the reservoir and the Mike O'Callaghan-Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge on foot, the utter majesty becomes evident to the senses.

As does the complexity of such an operation.

Hoover Dam is dignified, grandiose and imposing. It is largely unparalleled in scale, something that is wonderfully evident as you peer over it's walls. To one side you have the Colorado River pooling at the concrete barrier and around it's intake towers. The other side, the base of Hoover Dam where you'll find the powerplant and a steady stream of water disappearing over the bend. Both sides are very much contrasting yet they share one similarity; those rocky beasts I grew so fond of. Magnificently enveloping, like a protective parent; possessive and vigilant. I could have spent hours just staring down and around those surroundings, analyzing the contrast between nature and manmade.

And I must admit, when I first peered over on the side which houses the powerplant, I couldn't help but unsuccessfully search for that same door Clark Griswold popped out of after getting lost from his tour group. I don't have the best of eyesight so I was unsuccessful, leaving me to doubt myself. And doubt I did ever since, until I found this clip (watch here) in which someone else effortlessly locates it. I won't lie, I've been examining my photos for signs of it but alas can not make anything out. If you can spot it in any of these photos, please let me know!

There are also many notable references to the Art Deco period, which I found to be nicely unexpected. From monuments to sculptural reliefs, you'll find many dotted throughout. There's been much debate over time about these embellishments and their appropriateness. Some say it's too lavish and jarring for such landscape and structure. Others believe it compliments it beautifully, paying homage to a time of great dexterity and grandeur. I happen to agree with the latter.

I didn't get a chance to suitably view those memorials nor the flamboyant statues and sculptures. To be honest, I had no idea I'd find such things. Outrageously I didn't even detect these pronounced references myself. I was far too lost with mans achievement and the intricacies of nature. It wasn't until we were about to depart and as I walked past a grand golden door (see the image above) I overheard a man pointing out to his partner the Art Deco reliefs above it. He started to explain the importance and meaning behind each one, I was instantly fascinated, immediately observing the various references throughout the site. They'd been there all along and I was totally oblivious to them. I did attempt to eavesdrop further but there was far too much bustle in proximity.

Art Deco references shouldn't be of surprise considering Hoover Dam was constructed in 1931 and completed in 1936. Many lives were lost during it's development with tales of bodies being carelessly buried within the structure. Though I doubt there would be much validity to those stories since decaying corpses would cause air-pockets and obvious signs of concrete weakness would be evident. Their loss of life is no joke and has been somewhat immortalised within the vicinity through copious monuments, all varying in scale and design.

While magnificence is seemingly evident there is something rather unharmonious about Hoover Dam and that would be the notable drop in water levels, sharply annotated on the sides of those cliffs.

Water levels was something I overhead many a time when others spoke of Hoover Dam. In fact conversations were mostly fixed on this very subject. They wouldn't point out the brilliance of man or the dramatic scope of the site, it was always the decline and plunge of that reservoir. There were notable hints of despair and concern laced in their voices, a sadness even. And yet what baffled me most was with this genuine unease people were ostensibly doing nothing to aide the issue at hand.

As an Australian, drought is something I've grown up with. And this isn't something solely reserved for rural or arid areas either. Drought encompasses our main cities too. Melbourne went through extreme and concerning dearth a few years back spanning over decades no less. Back in 2008 our reservoirs dipped down to an alarming 30%. During that time we banded together as a whole to limit our use and preserve what very little we had. And we did so well before this too, back in 1996 restrictions were put in place which were carried out for many years. Showers were limited to four minutes only and households were sent miniature hourglass figurines to assist in this. Watering one's garden beds could only be done so during dawn and dusk but this didn't include lawns. And washing your car wasn't permitted as the use of a garden hose was banned. Though you could take your car to a car wash and have it cleaned there.

These were extreme measures but it needed to be done. So as someone who lived the majority of her life with water restrictions and the constant threat of aridity to come to Hoover Dam and witness something similar was disheartening. Especially to see that residents and companies were still so careless about this precious and essential natural commodity. Passing through various towns and states one thing was a constant. Homes and front yards were immaculately green and vehicles were constantly spotless and fresh. Then there are the numerous fountains you find in Las Vegas, unceasingly on display. Peoples concerns were rife and yet it felt like they were burying their heads in the sand, thinking this too shall pass.

And maybe it will, but is it truly going to hurt to consume less? To have patchy brown lawn or fountains that use recycled water?

Regardless I'd highly recommend a visit here. Especially if you find yourself in Sin City. It's a short drive from town and is a place that needs to be seen to be believed. Or at least to cross off your bucketlist. It is one the seven wonders of the world and that should be motivation enough.

This post has been a work in progress and is one that has taken much time and effort to creating. I've found myself lost in thought, daydreaming and reminiscing on my time here. Mostly regrets though as I wished I had planned our time better or done some research so I could have made the most of this visit. I'll definitely go back again, this time I'd take those tours to see its inner operations as well as perusing the many memorials throughout the site. Hoover Dam is immense in size not just in scale but in sights to actually see. I'd would love to venture back immediately though I feel it would be best to wait for the winter months as I can't even begin to imagine how busy it becomes during the summer (or how anyone even manages parking for that matter). It was rather crowded when we visited which wasn't peak season so just imagine what it would be like later on in the year. Honestly I don't think I could manage.

-Sxx













The Hoover Dam originally wasn't on the itinerary. In fact whilst composing said itinerary this wasn't even contemplated. More so because our time in this part of the world was brief and because it never really crossed my mind as a point of interest; not for this sojourn at least. Strangely enough this is a site I feel as though I am overly familiar with, having grown up viewing and hearing copious references many times over. And thanks to the countless 80's comedic movies I was consumed by as a child, I suppose you could say that magic of the Hoover Dam was lost on me. Or perhaps there never really was any to begin hence such blatant disregard for one of man's greatest accomplishments in engineering.

But alas as fate would have it, Hoover Dam was indeed explored on this trip; albeit a most brief expedition.

Because of a turn of kismet, suddenly this destination was highlighted. Yet in hindsight, it had been a forceful omnipresent the entire time. I'd just been so oblivious to it. While I noted remarks on it here and there, it was even more present whilst we gallivanted around the Vegas strip, where mentions of the Hoover Dam ran rampant. From tourism signage and placards to mere conversations between individuals waiting in lengthy lines. It almost was a hot topic of exchange, both in terms of general tourism and environmental matters.

So how did the Hoover Dam actually come to be for us? On our final night in Las Vegas (read about my time in Las Vegas here), I checked the National Park Service for any alerts for visiting the Grand Canyon the following day. To my dismay it advised against travel due to the anticipation of a snow storm centred for that area.

And thus the catalyst for visiting the Hoover Dam.

But it undeniably worked in our favor.

Not only did we get to see this marvel in person, we also avoided what would have been a horrendously unpleasant (read, frightful drive for two Aussie's who've never seen let alone driven in snow before) ride through a snow storm.

Though we far from escaped such terror as the drive from Hoover Dam to Flagstaff, Arizona saw our last leg literally navigating at a snails pace (and I mean literally). I may be a little dramatic when I speak of this drive as it wasn't too strenuous. At least nothing our faithful rental Jeep couldn't handle. We started with a parched landscape which then merged from barren and rocky to even more desolation and eventually thinning out to fall flush with the horizon, passionately emphasizing those monumental beasts we'd just slipped through.

After a while a blanket of white curtains and shields the accustomed plain of aridity before us. But in a flash it vanishes as we breeze past, making us question if our eyes were deceiving us. The next few moments do nothing to dispel such emotions as haphazard lumps of white splay here and there; reserved to one side of the road, then drastically moving to the other. At the sight of an upcoming field of snow I pull over and we revel in this phenomena. Our antics score us a chorus of vehicular toots from many a passerby; no doubt recognising the unfolding scenes as none other than Aussie tourist tomfoolery.

And while it was all fun and games at dusk, as we moved closer to our destination, nightfall crept and with it, temperatures plummeted as we slowly approached the fringes of a waning snow storm. The very one we tried so desperately to evade. Gripping the wheel I drove forth, unsure and utterly aghast over the possibility of black ice; whatever that was. And because of such uncertainty I kept the car at a leisurely pace, stuck fast behind a large semi-trailer, if he swerved, so did I. I refused to give up my position behind him, undeterred by the numerous vehicles sweeping past us. It felt like a fool proof plan and in the end, it got us to out destination in one piece. Despite being hours belated.

But enough of those snow escapades, I'll continue with this story in another post.

Visiting Hoover Dam was truly astounding and stirred so many emotions within. From serious concern over water levels to the phenomenal marvel of such a prodigious site and the seemingly glorious triumph of engineering. A legitimately monumental feat of construction; one dominating obvious intense power over Mother Nature herself. One so fierce that the actual creation and act of repressing such a mass and body of water literally marred the Earth's crust and induced hundreds of earthquakes.

The sheer scale of Hoover Dam is indescribable and it's easy to see why it had such an impact geologically.

And yet it's difficult to get a palpable sense of this as you drive over it; even while meandering through the various parking lots, catching glimpses here and there. Even when you step out of your car it's hard to grasp (depending on where you've parked). But as you close in on the reservoir and the Mike O'Callaghan-Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge on foot, the utter majesty becomes evident to the senses.

As does the complexity of such an operation.

Hoover Dam is dignified, grandiose and imposing. It is largely unparalleled in scale, something that is wonderfully evident as you peer over it's walls. To one side you have the Colorado River pooling at the concrete barrier and around it's intake towers. The other side, the base of Hoover Dam where you'll find the powerplant and a steady stream of water disappearing over the bend. Both sides are very much contrasting yet they share one similarity; those rocky beasts I grew so fond of. Magnificently enveloping, like a protective parent; possessive and vigilant. I could have spent hours just staring down and around those surroundings, analyzing the contrast between nature and manmade.

And I must admit, when I first peered over on the side which houses the powerplant, I couldn't help but unsuccessfully search for that same door Clark Griswold popped out of after getting lost from his tour group. I don't have the best of eyesight so I was unsuccessful, leaving me to doubt myself. And doubt I did ever since, until I found this clip (watch here) in which someone else effortlessly locates it. I won't lie, I've been examining my photos for signs of it but alas can not make anything out. If you can spot it in any of these photos, please let me know!

There are also many notable references to the Art Deco period, which I found to be nicely unexpected. From monuments to sculptural reliefs, you'll find many dotted throughout. There's been much debate over time about these embellishments and their appropriateness. Some say it's too lavish and jarring for such landscape and structure. Others believe it compliments it beautifully, paying homage to a time of great dexterity and grandeur. I happen to agree with the latter.

I didn't get a chance to suitably view those memorials nor the flamboyant statues and sculptures. To be honest, I had no idea I'd find such things. Outrageously I didn't even detect these pronounced references myself. I was far too lost with mans achievement and the intricacies of nature. It wasn't until we were about to depart and as I walked past a grand golden door (see the image above) I overheard a man pointing out to his partner the Art Deco reliefs above it. He started to explain the importance and meaning behind each one, I was instantly fascinated, immediately observing the various references throughout the site. They'd been there all along and I was totally oblivious to them. I did attempt to eavesdrop further but there was far too much bustle in proximity.

Art Deco references shouldn't be of surprise considering Hoover Dam was constructed in 1931 and completed in 1936. Many lives were lost during it's development with tales of bodies being carelessly buried within the structure. Though I doubt there would be much validity to those stories since decaying corpses would cause air-pockets and obvious signs of concrete weakness would be evident. Their loss of life is no joke and has been somewhat immortalised within the vicinity through copious monuments, all varying in scale and design.

While magnificence is seemingly evident there is something rather unharmonious about Hoover Dam and that would be the notable drop in water levels, sharply annotated on the sides of those cliffs.

Water levels was something I overhead many a time when others spoke of Hoover Dam. In fact conversations were mostly fixed on this very subject. They wouldn't point out the brilliance of man or the dramatic scope of the site, it was always the decline and plunge of that reservoir. There were notable hints of despair and concern laced in their voices, a sadness even. And yet what baffled me most was with this genuine unease people were ostensibly doing nothing to aide the issue at hand.

As an Australian, drought is something I've grown up with. And this isn't something solely reserved for rural or arid areas either. Drought encompasses our main cities too. Melbourne went through extreme and concerning dearth a few years back spanning over decades no less. Back in 2008 our reservoirs dipped down to an alarming 30%. During that time we banded together as a whole to limit our use and preserve what very little we had. And we did so well before this too, back in 1996 restrictions were put in place which were carried out for many years. Showers were limited to four minutes only and households were sent miniature hourglass figurines to assist in this. Watering one's garden beds could only be done so during dawn and dusk but this didn't include lawns. And washing your car wasn't permitted as the use of a garden hose was banned. Though you could take your car to a car wash and have it cleaned there.

These were extreme measures but it needed to be done. So as someone who lived the majority of her life with water restrictions and the constant threat of aridity to come to Hoover Dam and witness something similar was disheartening. Especially to see that residents and companies were still so careless about this precious and essential natural commodity. Passing through various towns and states one thing was a constant. Homes and front yards were immaculately green and vehicles were constantly spotless and fresh. Then there are the numerous fountains you find in Las Vegas, unceasingly on display. Peoples concerns were rife and yet it felt like they were burying their heads in the sand, thinking this too shall pass.

And maybe it will, but is it truly going to hurt to consume less? To have patchy brown lawn or fountains that use recycled water?

Regardless I'd highly recommend a visit here. Especially if you find yourself in Sin City. It's a short drive from town and is a place that needs to be seen to be believed. Or at least to cross off your bucketlist. It is one the seven wonders of the world and that should be motivation enough.

This post has been a work in progress and is one that has taken much time and effort to creating. I've found myself lost in thought, daydreaming and reminiscing on my time here. Mostly regrets though as I wished I had planned our time better or done some research so I could have made the most of this visit. I'll definitely go back again, this time I'd take those tours to see its inner operations as well as perusing the many memorials throughout the site. Hoover Dam is immense in size not just in scale but in sights to actually see. I'd would love to venture back immediately though I feel it would be best to wait for the winter months as I can't even begin to imagine how busy it becomes during the summer (or how anyone even manages parking for that matter). It was rather crowded when we visited which wasn't peak season so just imagine what it would be like later on in the year. Honestly I don't think I could manage.

-Sxx













88 comments

  1. Holy shit! How did you take all this beautiful shots?! Can I have some photography lessons from you!? LOL

    xx,
    Abby
    www.houseofakih.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ahahaha! The wonders of an iPhone and good editing Abby <3

      Delete
  2. It would be incredible to see in person, I'm glad you got to go, even if it wasn't on your original list of things to see. Well done on driving in the snow too, I don't think I could have done that!

    Away From The Blue Blog

    ReplyDelete
  3. What an amazing place and the images you took capture the beauty of it.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Ohhh, you are right - something about the Hoover Dam does feel quite familiar, perhaps it's because of all those pop-culture references we've grown up with. :) I absolutely love your photos by the way, and moreso - your writing! I could honestly just close my eyes and imagine myself being there. :) <3 Thanks for sharing, your posts are always so beautifully written!! x

    Kay
    http://www.shoesandglitter.com/

    ReplyDelete
  5. This is really beautiful!

    ** Join Love, Beauty Bloggers on facebook. A place for beauty and fashion bloggers from all over the world to promote their latest posts!


    INSTAGRAM @BEAUTYEDITER
    BEAUTYEDITER.COM

    ReplyDelete
  6. The pictures of your blog are really make me dream, you have a very beautiful blog and I will be glad if we follow each other, just let me know!
    Kisses

    ALISA GROMOVA

    ReplyDelete
  7. I watched a documentary recently called Dam Nation and it was very eye-opening about dams in the USA. I haven't been to Hoover Dam sine I was kid, makes me want to visit again. Beautiful photos!

    ReplyDelete
  8. What a beautiful place! Gorgeous photos! And I can't imagine driving in snow for the first time. I'm used to it from when I was younger, but I can just think about how you felt. Glad you were able to get to the dam safely. Beautiful post!
    ~Lili
    www.thefashionsalt.com

    ReplyDelete
  9. It's cool that you were able to fit Hoover Dam into your itinerary after all. I visited a number of years ago and it's really quite a magnificent structure especially in person.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Loving your blog <3
    Would you like to follow each other on gfc & fb? If you follow,let me know, i will follow back =))

    http://beautorgeousworld.blogspot.com/
    https://www.facebook.com/BeautorgeousWorld/

    ReplyDelete
  11. I love how the Hoover Dam has so many ties for you! I'll admit, I'd always thought of dams as rather ugly, and not exactly "interesting" pieces of architecture, but it is quite iconic.

    Living in California, we are in a drought as well, but it is sometimes surprising how unwilling people are to ration their water. When the ALS ice bucket challenge was going down a while ago, that was absolutely a nightmare.

    Angelina Is | Bloglovin'

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree with you, I've never seen them as interesting or beautiful but this one there is something so grand and majestic. Plus it really is an incredible feat of engineering too. xx

      Delete
  12. Such an amazing place! I'd love to go and visit it!

    Adi xx
    www.fancycorrectitude.com

    ReplyDelete
  13. what a structure!! :D

    Have a great day!
    Animated Confessions

    ReplyDelete
  14. A dream vrry magic photo
    Thank you. Good travel.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Yes dear. All that kind of buildings are made in porwerpoint. I'd love to know handle photoshop but is too laborious. I prefer things more practical. You had more luck than me since no one ever helped me

    Your ohotos are amazing, but this place seems to be super dangerous :/

    NEW TREND ALERT POST | Silk Scarfs For Men and Woman.
    InstagramFacebook Oficial PageMiguel Gouveia / Blog Pieces Of Me :D

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hehehe I think Powerpoint sounds like too much work myself. xx

      Delete
  16. LOVELY POST!!!!
    CHIARA
    http://www.chiaraangiolino.it/

    ReplyDelete
  17. Wow thats so cool you went too Hoover Dam
    xo
    www.laurajaneatelier.com

    ReplyDelete
  18. Wow, these photos are so impressive!

    http://violettedaily.com

    ReplyDelete
  19. So nice to see another US post of yours! Hopefully you have some more that you are going to share. In 2011 I drove past the Hoover Dam on my from Las Vegas to the Grand Canyon. Unfortunately I didn't stop as I didn't know that I was going to be nearby and only realized I was when I was speeding past it. Then a few days ago I watched "Piers Morgan on Las Vegas", which was filmed in 2009 or so. He visits the Hoover Dam and they talk about the water levels going down and the devastating impact it could have eight years from then. Well, seven years later, they still seem to get by or at least have contained the potential catastrophe... Next time I'm in LV, I will definitely take the time to stop and take photos as well. The entire construction is impressive indeed.

    LUXESSED

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes! I am slowly making my way through Anouk. Still have a few more to go. Just hard trying to find time to edit my photos and write everything up. I have soooo much to say (can you tell?) too which doesn't help the process. It's amazing how no one seems to put their hands up for Mother Nature. Everyone just buries their head in the sand. No joke, being in Vegas you'd walk past people talking about Hoover Dam and the water levels. The entire time I couldn't help but wonder why nothing was actively being done? I wonder if they did do something between 2009 and now though? xx

      Delete
  20. Great trip!

    Don't forget to visit me back,

    heymarsya.blogspot.co.id

    ReplyDelete
  21. Wow, so impressive!!! Incredible pics!!!
    xo Paola
    Expressyourself
    My Facebook

    ReplyDelete
  22. wow great pics
    http://carrieslifestyle.com

    ReplyDelete
  23. Wow, this place is amazing ;)

    xx
    Mónica Sors
    MES VOYAGES À PARIS
    NEW POST: MONICA SORS X AIRE BARCELONA - DREAM DRESSES

    ReplyDelete
  24. Wow the views are spectacular! It looks out of this world. Have a great weekend. Gemma x
    www.jacquardflower.uk

    ReplyDelete
  25. Definitely, Id love to visit it now, looks unbelievably stunning, wow! And u know, I feel so in awe looking at the pics, a little feeling of vertigo! Love the pic of u too, so inspirational!:) Kisses Sonia! xo

    ReplyDelete
  26. I have never seen the Hoover Dam either. Glad you got to visit, even if it wasn't plan, and avoid a dangerous storm.

    Amy Ann
    Straight A Style

    ReplyDelete
  27. Sonia, your travel posts are always so well-written, and this has to be one of my faves:) So glad you got the chance to go and see this...the shots are just so beautiful. I will always associate Hoover Dam with the 80's Superman movie:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Awww thanks Emmy Lou. These kind of posts have really been such a joy creating, laborious, yes but still so incredibly fun. Definitely revitalised my love for writing and blogging and perhaps opened my eyes to something more. I'd love to do more of these, granted I still have a few more posts from my last vacation to compose yet xx

      Delete
  28. Wow this is an incredible experience I would love to see it one day myself. Fantastic pictures.
    Beautetude

    ReplyDelete
  29. Great shots! So beautiful!
    xMC
    http://mc2squared.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  30. I read and learned about Hoover dam, is very amazing dam and your photos are perfect. Nice post.

    Somethingbykate

    ReplyDelete
  31. Wonderful blog! I love and i follow your blog, please follow me too
    http://alamodenatine.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
  32. Though it may not have initially been on your travel agenda, it certainly seems like a worthwhile trip! I can understand your concerns with regard to its purpose, though for the sake of photography alone it is something pretty spectacular. Your captures of the 'light play' across the architecture and rocks are amazing Sonia!

    aglassofice.com
    x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow thanks Gabrielle, the sun that day was so harsh (actually the entire trip I couldn't catch a break! It was always so bright) I'm surprised these photos turned out the way they did! xx

      Delete
  33. This is just so cool!! As an engineer, I have to geek out a little bit haha :)

    www.maggiealamode.com

    ReplyDelete
  34. Spectacular pictures and I agree: magnificent is a great word to describe this place.
    Seems like water sources as we know them are changing at the blink of an eye :(
    Indeed, its time to consume less. Easily said than done.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Wow! Stunning pictures in such a wonderful place. I've never visited, but it should be on list.

    xo
    www.carinavardie.com

    ReplyDelete
  36. Oh wow, you are one smart woman and staying behind the trailer was a clever decision especially when you're on a foreign road and with crappy weather. That being said, looks like the trip to Hoover Dam turned out in your favour. I can only imagine how majestic it is to see the dam in person.

    Shireen | Reflection of Sanity

    ReplyDelete
  37. Show de imagens arrasou, bom final de semana.
    Blog: http://arrasandonobatomvermelho.blogspot.com.br/
    Canal:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DmO8csZDARM

    ReplyDelete
  38. You took such beautiful photos of it! They really seem to capture the scale of the dam.

    Kathryn • The Fashionography

    ReplyDelete
  39. Isn’t it so crazy how much the weather can sway our view of a place, but your visit sounds like it was amazing!

    http://www.lucismorsels.com Luci’s Morsels | fashion. food. frivolity.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Gorgeous, I love it! x

    adelelydia.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  41. Coco!!!! I have missed your writing and your blog so much!!!! Looks like you are in the southwestern U.S. and I have to say that is one of my favorite areas. Sorry to hear that there were snow storms @ the grand canyon?? I've never heard of that?? I've never had a chance to visit the Hoover Dam, wow, it's grand isn't it? So happy to be back on your blog with you!!

    XOXO
    http://www.kellmenow.com/blog/
    https://www.instagram.com/kell_menow/
    https://www.facebook.com/kellmenow/?fref=ts
    https://twitter.com/kell_menow
    https://www.bloglovin.com/blogs/blog-kellmenow-14252307

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wasn't expecting snow storms! Bahaha, especially in Arizona no less but it was an amazing experience! xx

      Delete
  42. Honestly, your photography skills are on point! I can not get enough of these photos. And secondly, this looks and sounds like a really interesting and marvelous place/site. I heard about it a lot and a lot of movies have this included which makes it even more exciting for me :)

    -Leta | The Nerdy Me

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aww thank you Leta, I hope you get to see this beauty in person one day xx

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  43. wow!! really beautiful dam! amazing photos!!

    blog: www.fashi0n-m0de.blogspot.it
    youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCq_Aya-v4acfRK4qUYgi6vA

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  44. Always love those desert colors. The water line is particularly interesting!

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  45. My dear Sonia, this is a most powerful post. You have chosen each and every word carefully and deliberately. Sometimes things are just meant to be and in your case, Hoover Dam may not have been as unforeseeable as you may have thought. Everything happens for a reason:)

    Your photos are magnificent as is each and every word.

    Thank you so much for letting us tag-along on your journey. It was quite intuitive of you to follow the semi. I would have done the same thing:) I hope one day you get to return to the states and to Hoover Dam. While you're at it, visiting me on the east coast would be nice too:)

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    Replies
    1. East Coast for sure Louise. I have family over that side so you can be sure I'll be in your parts sooner or later xx

      Delete
  46. Lovely shots! <3 It looks like it's so hot in there when I look at your photos. Haha!

    Angelie // Mirenesse Studio Magic BB Pore Powder Review

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    Replies
    1. It actually was! And it's supposed to be winter too xx

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  47. Yikes that snowstorm sounds intense! These shots are absolutely gorgeous though <3
    britishmermaid.blogspot.co.uk

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  48. What a magnificent structure! I am not a big fan of these kind of sight seeings, but I do think it's a must-visit place! Great photos, S!

    Sun and Sany - Bulgarian travel and leisure blog

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  49. nice pictures
    new post
    http://www.melodyjacob.com/2016/04/backless-dress.html

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  50. Wow, amazing pictures! Great post,enjoy reading your post.

    Kisses
    http://ashonfashionary.com/

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  51. Hmm do the words zombie apocalypse mean anything? The zombies are just a metaphor, people need to wake up. But your photos are gorgeous really stunning. So glad you got to see this.

    Allie of ALLIENYC
    www.allienyc.com

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  52. These are truly stunning pictures of Hoover Dam, thanks for sharing them Sonia!
    I hope you have a lovely week ahead :)

    X

    Anjelique

    http://www.anjelique.com.au | snapchat: anjeliquetv

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  53. Wow, this looks like SUCH an incredible place and you've managed to capture some absolutely brilliant shots! xxx

    Sam // Samantha Betteridge

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  54. Your pictures really capture how big and vast it is! I haven't been there but perhaps I'll make a side trip when I'm in vegas!

    Macarons and Mischief

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  55. These pictures are literally incredible! You're so lucky to visit such a beautiful place. :)
    Words By Katie

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  56. Ive been in a dam before and it looks amazing when you are closer.
    I bet this experience was amazing.

    The Bandwagon Chic | Instagram | Bloglovin | Snapchat: bandwagonchic

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  57. Such beautiful photos!
    ~Samantha
    http://goldcoastgirlblog.com

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  58. Really beautiful photos, girl! I've never seen a "dam" or "the" hoover dam in person before - it looks almost scary!

    Jasmine | The Sixth Disney Princess

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  59. You photo are amazing! Love it! :)

    www.lifewithalk.blogspot.com

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  60. wow what gorgeous photographs. is it weird that seeing the pictures makes me think of one of the transformer movies? lol

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    Replies
    1. Not at all. I have no idea what your talking about because I haven't seen the movie but my friend had and that was all she kept talking about lol xx

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  61. These photos will never fail to amaze me! It's simply awe-inspiring! xx

    http://www.thatnewdress.com

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  62. Great post as always!!
    Hope you had a wonderful week!!
    Thanks for the support and thoughtful words on my recent post, I deeply appreciate it!!
    MyLyfeMyStory

    ReplyDelete
  63. Those photos are beautiful! What kind of camera do you use the quality is amazing?!

    www.mylifeasmilitza.com

    ReplyDelete

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